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Medical Malpractice Cases Statistics

Fewer Trials, Fewer Victories is the Trend in Medical Malpractice Cases

Source: 
U.S. Department of Justice

The U.S. Department of Justice has released information comparing trial results of various types of personal injury cases from the nation's 75 most populous counties.  This information compares data from 1996, 2001, and 2005.  In 1996, there were 10,278 total trials of personal injury cases in these counties.  By 2001, this number had dropped to 7,948.  By 2005, the number again dropped to 7,038.  This represents a total decrease of 31.5%.

Statistical Trends in Medical Malpractice Cases

10/18/2005
Source: 
Jury Verdict Research

In its 2002 comprehensive report titled: "Medical Malpractice: Verdicts, Settlements and Statistical Analysis, Jury Verdict Research details nationwide statistics regarding medical malpractice cases.

Jury Verdict Research (JVR), maintains a nationwide database of verdicts from plaintiff and defense attorneys. JVR is supplied with data from every state in the nation. JVR was founded in 1961.

Medical Malpractice Litigation Rarely Compensates Victims

10/18/2005
Source: 
Harvard Medical Practice Study

In 1990, The Harvard Medical Practice Study was published. This report, titled, "Patients, Doctors, and Lawyers: Medical Injury, Malpractice Litigation and Patient Compensation in New York," was conducted to estimate medical malpractice and the injuries caused by medical malpractice in New York.The study utilized physician reviewers of records and consultants who were New York specialists.

Health Care Providers Win Most Cases

10/18/2005
Source: 
Jury Verdict Research

According to Jury Verdict Research, in the year 2000, health care providers won approximately 62% of the cases that were tried by a jury. That means that the patients only prevailed in approximately 38% of all the jury trial cases in this country.

In cases involving the allegation of misdiagnosis in a medical malpractice case, patients only won 37% of the jury trials against the defendant health care providers. These lopsided statistics demonstrate that the jury system in this country is not using sympathy to give run away verdicts to patients of medical malpractice.

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